All posts tagged: reviews

Book Review: Everything Leads To You by Nina LaCour

It’s not often that I rate a contemporary book 5 stars, but Everything Leads to You really did it for me. This book was truly breathtaking and beautiful. It’s such a true betrayal of friendship, love, being true to yourself in such a fun and enchanting way that Nina LaCour handles with such an incredible voice that I found it near impossible to put down. Our main character is Emi. Although growing up in a privileged household, Emi would have to be one of the most down to earth characters I have read about in a long time. Outside of school, Emi spends her time working on movie sets and trying to make a name for herself as a production designer in Hollywood. She is one of the most loyal friends I have come across in contemporary fiction, and I couldn’t help but fall in love with her a little bit over how much she truly cares about everyone and everything she encounters. She is determined to make a name for herself, but I can’t imagine her sacrificing her values for …

Book Review: None of the Above by I. W. Gregorio

Note: I read to this book via audiobook.  While None of the Above is not the best YA contemporary I have ever read, I am genuinely glad that I took the time to read this book. It was such an authentic, realistic and informative book that I couldn’t help but finish it and feel as though I had had a really important reading experience. I feel like unlike a lot of readers, I did already know the basics about what it meant to be ‘intersex’ before reading this book, but when I say I know the basics, that is the extent of what I mean. I was not at all an expert about what it means to be intersex. None of the Above not only helped clarify to me what being intersex really means, but it also gave me what I perceived to be a realistic portrayal of a teenage girl learning that she has a disorder of sex development, and what that means regarding her gender. Kristen finds out she is intersex shortly after being crowned her high school’s homecoming queen. And …

Book Review: Magonia by Maria Dahvana Headley

Magonia is an utterly unique, breathtaking and highly imaginative novel that I found myself engrossed in within chapters. Aza can’t breathe. Her disease is a mystery to every doctor and incurable. She’s going to die soon; she always knew it would happen. Things are getting worst though. It’s when all her hopes falter and she feels herself weaken to a very dangerously sensitive and raw state that she sees something spectacular amid the sky: ships that sail into the air! I’ll admit that before I picked up this book, I did not know too much about the premise. I had heard it compared to The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender which is said to be beautifully written, and the cover was gorgeous, so I was immediately taken by this book. Later, when I heard about the fantastical elements, I knew I had to read it immediately. It sounded exactly what I felt like. And it was. Magonia is one of the most unique and bizarre books I have ever read. It’s so incredibly rare that you find a …

Comic Review: Spider-Gwen (Volume 1) Written by Jason Latour and Illustrated by Robbi Rodriguez

I read this in issue format, as volume 1 is not released until November 2015. I definitely did not pick the correct place to start reading the whole Spider-Verse event. From what I can tell the background for this character and universe is introduced in earlier events, so I found myself playing catch up a lot as I was reading this. However despite that, I really enjoyed reading these issues. This Gwen is from a different universe, where instead of Peter Parker being bitten by a radioactive spider, it was Gwen Stacy. Overall, these issues weren’t exactly plot-heavy. There wasn’t really that much happening. But still, there was a lot to love. Gwen Stacy has always been one of my favourite characters from the Spider-Man world, and I really enjoyed reading her as a main protagonist. At first I had real trouble getting into this, however as the issues went on and relationships (especially Gwen and her father) began to flesh out, I really began enjoying myself. This is probably my favourite father-daughter relationship I’ve …

Book Review: The Giver by Lois Lowry

Almost everyone I’ve spoken to about The Giver absolutely raves about it. So I went into this book with extremely high hopes. And while I see why this could be considered a good dystopian novel with some great core values, I just really don’t understand the hype that comes along with this novel. I did really enjoy the world that Lowry created. Jonas, a twelve year old boy, lives in a world of “Sameness” It is a world governed by strict rules, structure and conformity. No one knows anything different than what they experience, apart from The Receiver. When Jonas is selected to be The Receiver, he must receive The Giver’s memories of the past. And what he learns shows a world drastically different than Jonas knows. What I loved most about this novel was the issue raised about the price of happiness, freedom and responsibility. C’mon, it’s a world devoid of feelings and emotion. Brilliant. However, there were quite a few points in this novel where I thought that things could have been more exciting. Quite a lot of it was bland …

Book Review: Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Wonder is one of those rare books that you know will impact your life within the first chapter. It’s a beautifully written, humorous, eye-opening and heart-warming read that everyone should take time out to read, because who knows, it might just change your life too. The story focuses August (Auggie), a ten year old boy who suffers from severe facial abnormalities. Up until this point, his mum has homeschooled him, however when it’s time for Auggie to enter middle school they decide to send him to a private school. When he begins school at the beginning of the semester, he faces a number of new experiences from friendship to bullies, and he must deal with the shock that everyone has when they see him for the first time. Told from multiple character perspectives, this is the story of August and the people that have affected and been affected in his life. Typically, Wonder is categorised as a children’s book. While the writing is simplistic, with easy-to-read short chapters, I do believe that this is a book almost anyone could …

Book Review: Solitaire by Alice Oseman

I hate to admit it, but I’m really torn on how I felt about this book. Prior to reading it, I had heard nothing but excellent things about this novel. Everyone had absolutely raved about Solitaire on all social media platforms, that I think I was just expecting it to be absolutely phenomenal. I don’t usually read much contemporary, however by quickly glancing at the premise for this book (and listening to the crazy amounts of hype) I couldn’t help but come immediately intrigued and pick up a copy. One of my favourite things about this novel was definitely the way Alice Oseman was able to portray being a teenager. It’s been a long time since there has been a good, stand alone novel that capture teen life quite like this book does. It is a raw look into the life of a teenage girl, that isn’t overly dramatic and filled with dozens of potential love interests and romantic plot devices. The main character, Tori, was truly one of my favourite aspects of this novel. She was one …