All posts filed under: reviews

Comic Review: Thor: Goddess of Thunder (Volume 1) Written by Jason Aaron and Illustrated by Russell Dauterman

“Thor? Thor’s a woman now? Like the for-real Thor? She ain’t called She-Thor or Lady Thunderstrike or nothing like that?” I never had too much interest in reading Thor. I have read comic series that he has featured in, however the idea of reading a solo Thor comic never appealed to me that much. However, when it was announced that Marvel had a female Thor in the works, I immediately became intrigued and knew I would be picking up at least the first issue. Replacing the original Thor was a hugely risky and controversial move on Jason Aaron’s part, but in my opinion, it’s been a hugely successful choice and well worth the potentional backlash. I really enjoyed reading this volume. I loved the new Thor. While the Frost Giant plot was lacking something, I really loved seeing this new girl kicking major butt, just like the regular old Thor. I also really enjoyed the way we were able to catch a glimpse into her mind by being able to see what she was thinking …

Book Review: Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

Let me begin this by saying that I had heard nothing but good things about this novel before going into it. Now that I’ve finished it, I have looked up a lot of bad reviews and it was such a relief to find that other people agreed with me. Shatter Me is a debut romance dystopian YA novel by Tahereh Mafi. The protagonist is a teenage girl named Juliette who’s been kept in solitary confinement for nearly a year because of her lethal touch. When a boy named Adam, who she happens to have history with, is thrown into her sell, everything begins to change. Warner, son of the Supreme Commander and leader of sector 45, wants to use Juliette as a weapon. Premise alone, this book sounds extremely interesting. The ideal of having a lethal touch is intriguing and I like the idea of people trying to use Juliette as a weapon against her will. It’s a bit cliched, but it does make sense. Unfortunately, there were so many things in this book that didn’t work that I didn’t enjoy it …

Book Review: The Giver by Lois Lowry

Almost everyone I’ve spoken to about The Giver absolutely raves about it. So I went into this book with extremely high hopes. And while I see why this could be considered a good dystopian novel with some great core values, I just really don’t understand the hype that comes along with this novel. I did really enjoy the world that Lowry created. Jonas, a twelve year old boy, lives in a world of “Sameness” It is a world governed by strict rules, structure and conformity. No one knows anything different than what they experience, apart from The Receiver. When Jonas is selected to be The Receiver, he must receive The Giver’s memories of the past. And what he learns shows a world drastically different than Jonas knows. What I loved most about this novel was the issue raised about the price of happiness, freedom and responsibility. C’mon, it’s a world devoid of feelings and emotion. Brilliant. However, there were quite a few points in this novel where I thought that things could have been more exciting. Quite a lot of it was bland …

Book Review: Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Wonder is one of those rare books that you know will impact your life within the first chapter. It’s a beautifully written, humorous, eye-opening and heart-warming read that everyone should take time out to read, because who knows, it might just change your life too. The story focuses August (Auggie), a ten year old boy who suffers from severe facial abnormalities. Up until this point, his mum has homeschooled him, however when it’s time for Auggie to enter middle school they decide to send him to a private school. When he begins school at the beginning of the semester, he faces a number of new experiences from friendship to bullies, and he must deal with the shock that everyone has when they see him for the first time. Told from multiple character perspectives, this is the story of August and the people that have affected and been affected in his life. Typically, Wonder is categorised as a children’s book. While the writing is simplistic, with easy-to-read short chapters, I do believe that this is a book almost anyone could …

Book Review: Solitaire by Alice Oseman

I hate to admit it, but I’m really torn on how I felt about this book. Prior to reading it, I had heard nothing but excellent things about this novel. Everyone had absolutely raved about Solitaire on all social media platforms, that I think I was just expecting it to be absolutely phenomenal. I don’t usually read much contemporary, however by quickly glancing at the premise for this book (and listening to the crazy amounts of hype) I couldn’t help but come immediately intrigued and pick up a copy. One of my favourite things about this novel was definitely the way Alice Oseman was able to portray being a teenager. It’s been a long time since there has been a good, stand alone novel that capture teen life quite like this book does. It is a raw look into the life of a teenage girl, that isn’t overly dramatic and filled with dozens of potential love interests and romantic plot devices. The main character, Tori, was truly one of my favourite aspects of this novel. She was one …

Movie Review: Insurgent – Spoiler Free

I will admit upfront that I did not re-read the novel before going and seeing the film. It has been a solid two years since I finished the book and I had forgotten nearly everything that happened prior to entering the theatre. This, however, did not stop me from going to see the movie tonight. And I definitely have mixed opinions on it. Insurgent is the highly anticipated sequel to the 2014 adaption of the first book in the world-famous Divergent Trilogy. With a hot cast (both hot in fame, and in looks), an action packed plot and – what’s that? – a dystopian theme, it was always bound to be a hit in the box office. But whether or not it’s a hit because of the book’s fame (most likely) or because it’s genuinely a good film? That’s questionable. Insurgent begins just after the events of the first film, however unlike the previous, it wasn’t entirely clear what was happening if you hadn’t read the books first. New characters were introduced left right and centre, giving viewers little chance to …

Book Review: Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

If you had of asked me what I thought of this novel just after I finished, I would have said one thing: disturbing. I went into Sharp Objects hoping for an engrossing, relentless murder thriller, filled with complex characters, and that’s exactly what I got. Gillian Flynn did not disappoint me with her first novel. It takes talent to be able to write characters that suffer from raw emotional issues that don’t come off as being melodramatic, but Flynn pulled it off easily, making the characters truly real. Fresh out of a psychiatric ward and working as a journalist, Camille Parker returns to her home town to investigate the murders of two young girls. Moving back in with her neurotic, hypochondriac mother, ineffectual and absent step father, and step-sister who has bizarre grasp on reality, Camille finds herself becoming tangled in the world she’d left behind. Sharp Objects is a deeply unhealthy book that is not for the light hearted. Exploring dark, somewhat frightening mental issues such as self harm and abuse, Gillian Flynn has …