All posts filed under: reviews

Book Review: The Martian by Andy Weir

(This is more of a gush-review than a proper review, but shhh, let’s ignore that) This is a fast-paced, compelling adventure story about astronaut Mark Watney who is left behind on Mars, presumed dead, with no hope of rescue. I have been craving an amazing sci-fi, space novel for months now and Andy Weir did not disappoint with his debut novel. It’s an insanely well-researched, impossibly funny story that has you rooting for Mark from the very first sentence. From the moment he wakes up alone with his crew gone, to his possible rescue attempt, you can’t help but grow to love Mark with his quirky and hilarious internal dialogue. The Martian is written in diary format, as Mark documents his survival story on Mars. Mark logs his days to share what he has to face and fix throughout that sol on Mars. The diary-like effect really made you get to know and connect with Watney right away, and he was instantly a new favourite character of mine. This book is very technical, something you should be aware of before diving into …

Book Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

Books can be deceiving. If you’ve managed not to have heard of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – congratulations! I don’t know where you’ve been hiding out recently, but with the release of its sequel (Hollow City) last year, I feel like it’s been impossible not to log into Goodreads or Bloglovin’ or Youtube without hearing someone gushing over this incredibly unique, scary, young adult horror book. With all the rave reviews, it’s hard not to go into a book with the highest of high expectations. And just as could be guessed, none of mine were met. The cover alone helped add to the thought that this was going to be a horror novel (c’mon, just look at it!) and I was fully expecting some haunted-house stuff, and something that would warrant all the people that said this was a perfectly creepy halloween read. Instead, I got a story about an annoying young boy who has the ability to travel through time and meets a cast of children who all have some type of special power? Definitely not what I signed up …

Book Review: Everything Leads To You by Nina LaCour

It’s not often that I rate a contemporary book 5 stars, but Everything Leads to You really did it for me. This book was truly breathtaking and beautiful. It’s such a true betrayal of friendship, love, being true to yourself in such a fun and enchanting way that Nina LaCour handles with such an incredible voice that I found it near impossible to put down. Our main character is Emi. Although growing up in a privileged household, Emi would have to be one of the most down to earth characters I have read about in a long time. Outside of school, Emi spends her time working on movie sets and trying to make a name for herself as a production designer in Hollywood. She is one of the most loyal friends I have come across in contemporary fiction, and I couldn’t help but fall in love with her a little bit over how much she truly cares about everyone and everything she encounters. She is determined to make a name for herself, but I can’t imagine her sacrificing her values for …

Book Review: None of the Above by I. W. Gregorio

Note: I read to this book via audiobook.  While None of the Above is not the best YA contemporary I have ever read, I am genuinely glad that I took the time to read this book. It was such an authentic, realistic and informative book that I couldn’t help but finish it and feel as though I had had a really important reading experience. I feel like unlike a lot of readers, I did already know the basics about what it meant to be ‘intersex’ before reading this book, but when I say I know the basics, that is the extent of what I mean. I was not at all an expert about what it means to be intersex. None of the Above not only helped clarify to me what being intersex really means, but it also gave me what I perceived to be a realistic portrayal of a teenage girl learning that she has a disorder of sex development, and what that means regarding her gender. Kristen finds out she is intersex shortly after being crowned her high school’s homecoming queen. And …

Book Review: Magonia by Maria Dahvana Headley

Magonia is an utterly unique, breathtaking and highly imaginative novel that I found myself engrossed in within chapters. Aza can’t breathe. Her disease is a mystery to every doctor and incurable. She’s going to die soon; she always knew it would happen. Things are getting worst though. It’s when all her hopes falter and she feels herself weaken to a very dangerously sensitive and raw state that she sees something spectacular amid the sky: ships that sail into the air! I’ll admit that before I picked up this book, I did not know too much about the premise. I had heard it compared to The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender which is said to be beautifully written, and the cover was gorgeous, so I was immediately taken by this book. Later, when I heard about the fantastical elements, I knew I had to read it immediately. It sounded exactly what I felt like. And it was. Magonia is one of the most unique and bizarre books I have ever read. It’s so incredibly rare that you find a …

Comic Review: Spider-Gwen (Volume 1) Written by Jason Latour and Illustrated by Robbi Rodriguez

I read this in issue format, as volume 1 is not released until November 2015. I definitely did not pick the correct place to start reading the whole Spider-Verse event. From what I can tell the background for this character and universe is introduced in earlier events, so I found myself playing catch up a lot as I was reading this. However despite that, I really enjoyed reading these issues. This Gwen is from a different universe, where instead of Peter Parker being bitten by a radioactive spider, it was Gwen Stacy. Overall, these issues weren’t exactly plot-heavy. There wasn’t really that much happening. But still, there was a lot to love. Gwen Stacy has always been one of my favourite characters from the Spider-Man world, and I really enjoyed reading her as a main protagonist. At first I had real trouble getting into this, however as the issues went on and relationships (especially Gwen and her father) began to flesh out, I really began enjoying myself. This is probably my favourite father-daughter relationship I’ve …

Book Review: Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon is released on September 1st 2015.  Madeline has SCID or Severe Combined Immunodeficiency which leaves her trapped inside her house. Her life is a cycle of reading, medical tests and playing games with her mother. That is, until a new family moves in next door. What fascinated me most about this book was Madeline’s SCID. I suffer quite badly from allergies (nothing like Maddy does), however I do suffer from a range of food, animal and air/dust allergies. In fact, the reason I chose to pick this book up when I did was after I suffered a large allergy attack at an airport and was left rather shaken up. I thought I would be able to relate quite easily to this book, however that just wasn’t the case at all. In the end, I found so many small inconsistencies that I couldn’t bring myself to enjoy the book. The novel was lacking what I was really hoping for an expecting in this novel: a young girl dealing with SCID in a …