All posts filed under: reviews

Week of Reviews: The Grownup by Gillian Flynn [1]

It takes serious skill to write a story so engaging in only 64 pages, but of course Gillian Flynn hit it out of the park (is that the saying? I’m Australian I don’t know these baseball terms… Is it even baseball?!) with this chilling, creepy read! I thoroughly enjoyed this short story. Leave it to Gillan Flynn pull me out of my reading slump and dump me back on dry land desperate to read something that would live up to this. But that’s how I felt after reading it. Before picking this up I hadn’t managed to finish a book in what felt like forever (but was actually probably only a week or two) but after flying through this story in just over half an hour I found myself craving something that would mimic the feeling I experienced while reading. Gillian Flynn’s writing style always has me completely captivated, and this was no exception. Essentially The Grownup is a modern-day take on a haunted house story. It follows a fake psychic, who agrees to help Susan as she’s encountering problems with her step-son and …

Week of Reviews – Starting tomorrow!

I have been behind on reviews for so, so long now that I can’t even joke about it! It’s gotten to a point where it is completely overwhelming having a pile of books just waiting to be reviewed – so I’ve given myself a challenge! This week I have dared myself to write 5 reviews in 5 days. Essentially, a week of reviews. I plan on having a book review up every weekday at 12pm AEST this week, so if you’re keen to hear some of my thoughts on what I’ve managed to read recently, I recommend dropping by here to see my thoughts! Wish me luck! xo

Book Review: Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Once again Rainbow Rowell has pulled through and written one of my favourite novels. Carry On is a book based off a fanfiction written in another book that is based off a series that is based off Harry Potter? Kind of. Sort of. It’s hard to explain. But regardless of the controversy that surrounded this one, I couldn’t help but absolutely adore this novel. This book is by far one of the most magical, cute, funny and heartfelt novels I have ever read, and definitely one of my favourite books of 2015. When Simon Snow returns to his eighth year Watford, a school for magical school, he becomes suspicious that his archnemesis/roommate did not show up for term. With tensions running high, Simon can’t help but think that Baz is planning something. When Baz finally returns, things begin to change. Instead of hating Baz, Simon is concerned. And instead of wanting to kill Simon, Baz wants to kiss him. As the world around them begins to crumble, Simon and Baz realise that they probably work better as a team than as enemies. …

Book Review: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

Trust me when I say you have got to pick up this book. After hearing so much praise about this debut novel and even hearing it compared to Benjamin Alire Sáenz’ Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (one of my favourite books of 2015!), I finally got myself around to picking up my own copy on kindle and you can guarantee I don’t regret it. While it doesn’t appear at first, More Happy Than Not is a dark, sad book that deals with class, race, homophobia, depression and suicide. I heard a few reviewers mention just how sad this book was before I picked it up but I shook it off as them exaggerating, because it couldn’t be as sad as they were describing, right? But it was and I should have listened. This is a story about Aaron who is trying to move on after both his father’s suicide and his own attempted suicide. He spends his days hanging out with his guy friends at his apartment complex where he lives in a one-bedroom apartment with his mum and brother and spends his …

Book Review: Room by Emma Donoghue

Emma Donoghue’s Room has been so incredibly hyped up online that I couldn’t help but go into it with exceedingly high expectations, but unfortunately none of them were met. The book itself has received a variety of awards and nominations, including being shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2010, all of which I can’t quite wrap my head around because like I said, I just didn’t enjoy this book. Room, as five-year-old Jack calls home, is the only place he’s ever known. But for his mother, it’s been her prison since she was abducted seven years ago. The story is compelling – a mother’s love creates a world for her son in a single room, even as she grows more and more desperate to escape. The book itself is narrated by Jack, and that’s where my issues with this book began. To wholeheartedly enjoy (or even tolerate) a book I usually have to find some sort of connection to it, but the fact that this was narrated by a five-year-old boy made it nearly impossible to do …

Book Review: Vicious by V. E. Schwab

I must admit that after picking up this novel I am slightly ashamed that I haven’t already read all of Victoria Schwab’s works. This book absolutely blew my expectations out of the water, and they were already exceedingly high! Vicious is an adult-fantasy novel written by American author Victoria Schwab about two college roommates who are driven by ambition and adrenaline to discover how people can obtain extraordinary abilities. However when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental things being to go terribly wrong. Vicious is a tale of superheroes and supervillians and one I definitely recommend if you are a fan of comic books (like myself). The story is split between present and 10 years ago. The present tells the story of Victor, an escaped convict, who is determined to find and face his old friend-turned-enemy who seems to be making his mark around the city. Flash back ten years and Victor is a young, intelligent university student who is practically inseparable from his best friend and roommate – Eli. At the beginning of this book it wasn’t clear who’s side …

Book Review: The Messenger by Markus Zusak

For years, I have been telling people that The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is my favourite book and that Markus Zusak is one of my favourite authors. Looking back, I probably shouldn’t have claimed that Zusak was my favourite author when I’d only read one of his books. However after reading The Messenger I can happily say that he has lived up to the hype! After accidentally stopping a bank robber escaping, Ed Kennedy finds himself receiving cryptic messages written on playing cards in the mail. Each card gives hints to three people who’s life he must change in someway. I don’t know what I was expecting going into this novel, but after only a few chapters I was hooked. Zusak’s writing is superb. Both the premise and the ‘twist’ at the end of the novel really hit the mark for me. The characterisation in this novel was absolutely on point and I found myself unable to put this novel down. He flawlessly creates relatable characters that are witty, funny and at moments touching. The first half of this book was brilliant and …